Brother, Can you Spare a Dime?

Memories of early life with brain injury conjure the feelings of unwanted, orphan children making the best of their childhood; swinging awkwardly, unwatched, unguided, yet nonetheless playing on a rusted swing set among the overgrowth of a condemned playground.  But time is money, and we all know that cash is king!  The memories of old become polished, understandable, and okay as we move through the stages of recovery.  I will share one quick memory that made me smile today.  At the time, no appreciation or lifting of my anguish occurred.  Now, with the payments afforded through months and months or growth and reflection, I know this thirty seconds of memory reaffirmed whatever it is that makes people everything they can be along the spectrum – from cruel, psychopathic, and all the way through the gradient to the act I experienced that seems almost saintly.

Perhaps four-six months post moderate TBI, I was on my own, as usual, tasked with at least making it on my own to routine appointments.  I even had a notebook with a decision tree.  What decision came next was in writing for my review.  I took the Bay Area Rapid Transit BART train system from Richmond, CA, to downtown San Francisco for my twice weekly psychotherapy appointments with my longtime psychiatrist.  Being out of work and living in the SF Bay Area on SSDI made money a constant threat to my wellbeing.  One impulsive decision and I could not afford groceries – you know the story.  Back to the story at hand, I left for my trip into San Francisco and deposited my last 20 dollars, saw it had loaded on my train ticket, and knew it would get me there and back without a hiccup.  Except with brain injury there is always a hiccup.  Mine came on my return ride home.  BART charges the fare according to the length of your trip, and if you do not have adequate funds on your ticket, an agent will prevent you from leaving the station until the issue is resolved.  I passed my ticket through the gate and the red alert of “insufficient funds” flashed.  Twice.  Then a third time as I moved down the gates, assuming the card reader was the problem.  When a shoulder of mine was pulled with the force enough to turn my body 180 degrees, I looked into the eyes of a weary station agent at the Richmond, CA BART station; Richmond, and I assume it’s BART station, have seen and heard it all.  So, seemed, from the look of this agent that no “story” or promise I had paid earlier when departing would be met with unquestioned trust.  I plead my case; I was certain my 20 dollars had been added, and confirmed to be loaded on my ticket that very morning.  I do not ride BART alone often, and this is my habit – the machine must be stealing my money.  “You have one dollar and forty cents.  I need you to load the balance onto your fare before you can leave the station.”  My emotional lability teetered between shock, anger, fear, and finally settling on the threat that I was being taken advantage of – again.  That was my twenty dollars, please fix this ticket.  I have never been more certain before.  Please, I grunted, people try to take advantage of others all the time, and I am not having it.  “Yes, but I am running your ticket’s history and you never loaded anything on it this morning.  It was last used weeks ago, and the balance is just over a dollar.  You did not put twenty dollars on this ticket.” My body language and speech must have begun to deteriorate noticeably, as they do when I am cognitively taxed.  I knew I was right, and said so again.  After the same explanation, I again stated my memory was correct; that twenty dollars had been taken from me.  “Do you have any problems?” The agent asked, stepping back and relaxing his tone.  “I have a brain injury. Why?”  I said loudly and defensively.  The agent sighed, knowing this was going to be a difficult time to have to involve the BART police.  I wasn’t asking for money, I was asking for my money back.  No measurable amount of seconds passed before a lean, late-thirties aged man simply stuck twenty dollars in my hand and walked through the gate without a word.  Even more, he did this without even a look back towards us; his action was automatic, thoughtless, part of his being and not a calculation between altruism and a chance to preen his pride.  I couldn’t appreciate what a kind gesture this was at the time.  I felt my stolen money had been returned by a passenger who decided to end the public bickering at the gates I was blocking.  Or perhaps he had the money to give, and not the time to spare intervening and simply paying my six or seven dollars fare.

Today I thought about how this was the first time I was asked if I had a brain “problem” by a stranger.  I thought my deficits, if they even amounted to much, were not perceptible.  They were clear as the day, but concealed most of all to myself.  Second, this stranger who passed through without a break in his stride, understanding I felt owed twenty dollars, not simply the fare, knew without more than seeing and hearing the way I carried myself, interacted, repeated questions and answers, and bore a look of confusion that I poorly powdered with a layer of independence and pride.  He knew what a human being is; it is a life exposed to the elements of hate, joy, ecstasy, awe, inspiration, loneliness, wonder, indifference, humor, anger, compassion, and pain of the greatest heights.  I wish him the greatest of heights in his journey walking this earth.

-Sean Dudas

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Emotional Intel. Part One

img_1563Everyone’s always talking about Emotional Intelligence (EI) but what exactly is it? One important aspect of emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions – in oneself and others – and to use that information appropriately. For example, recognizing emotional intelligence in oneself can help you regulate and manage your emotions, while recognizing emotions in others can lead to empathy and success in your relationships, both personal and professional. Given the importance of emotional intelligence, I thought it might be helpful to give a very brief overview of the topic, as well as 10 ways to enhance your emotional intelligence, originally published in my book “The Emotional Revolution.” In 1990, Yale psychologists John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey originally coined the term emotional intelligence, which some researchers claim that is an inborn characteristic, while others suggest that you can improve it with proper guidance and practice. I agree with both schools and obviously with the latter – or I wouldn’t be giving you tips as to what you can do to improve your EI. It may not be possible for everyone to have a psychotherapist. But you can become your own therapist. (After all, Freud analyzed himself.) It all starts with learning how to listen to your feelings. While it may not always be easy, developing the ability to tune in to your own emotions is the first and perhaps most important step. Here are 10 Ways to Enhance Your Emotional Intelligence: 1. Don’t interrupt or change the subject. If feelings are uncomfortable, we may want to avoid them by interrupting or distracting ourselves. Sit down at least twice a day and ask, “How am I feeling?” It may take a little time for the feelings to arise. Allow yourself that small space of time, uninterrupted. 2. Don’t judge or edit your feelings too quickly. Try not to dismiss your feelings before you have a chance to think them through. Healthy emotions often rise and fall in a wave, rising, peaking, and fading naturally. Your aim should be not to cut off the wave before it peaks. 3. See if you can find connections between your feelings and other times you have felt the same way. When a difficult feeling arises, ask yourself, “When have I felt this feeling before?” Doing this may help you to realize if your current emotional state is reflective of the current situation, or of another time in your past. 4. Connect your feelings with your thoughts. When you feel something that strikes you as out of the ordinary, it is always useful to ask, “What do I think about that?” Often times, one of our feelings will contradict others. That’s normal. Listening to your feelings is like listening to all the witnesses in a court case. Only by admitting all the evidence will you be able to reach the best verdict. 5. Listen to your body. A knot in your stomach while driving to work may be a clue that your job is a source of stress. A flutter of the heart when you pick up a girl you have just started to date may be a clue that this could be “the real thing.” Listening to these sensations and the underlying feelings that they signal will allow you to process with your powers of reason. 6. If you don’t know how you’re feeling, ask someone else. People seldom realize that others are able to judge how they are feeling. Ask someone who knows you (and whom you trust) how you are coming across. You may find the answer both surprising and illuminating. 7. Tune in to your unconscious feelings. How can you become more aware of your unconscious feelings? Try free association. While in a relaxed state, allow your thoughts to roam freely and watch where they go. Analyze your dreams. Keep a notebook and pen at the side of your bed and jot down your dreams as soon as you wake up. Pay special attention to dreams that repeat or are charged with powerful emotion. 8. Ask yourself: How do I feel today? Start by rating your overall sense of well-being on a scale of 0 and 100 and write the scores down in a daily log book. If your feelings seem extreme one day, take a minute or two to think about any ideas or associations that seem to be connected with the feeling. 9. Write thoughts and feelings down. Research has shown that writing down your thoughts and feelings can help profoundly. A simple exercise like this could take only a few hours per week. 10. Know when enough is enough. There comes a time to stop looking inward; learn when its time to shift your focus outward. Studies have shown that encouraging people to dwell upon negative feelings can amplify these feelings. Emotional intelligence involves not only the ability to look within, but also to be present in the world around you. Chapter 5 in my book, The Emotional Revolution: Harnessing the Power of Your Emotions for a More Positive Life, goes into greater detail on emotional intelligence. Wishing you Light and Transcendence, Norman “Copyright Norman Rosenthal” Popular Books by Norman Rosenthal, MD: Click to Order Transcendence, Winter Blues, The Emotional Revolution