111 N.F.L. Brains. All But One Had C.T.E. – The New York Times

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What Is Your Way of Finding Hope?

To be honest, I hope has been the word mostly ending in “less” until my stages of recovery allowed me to attempt to find myself again. I don’t have much that I can guarantee will give me hope when I turn to it, but there are some beautiful things and some loving people in this world and I know that as I build my own self and love further in time, hope will be all around us.

Today, I thought I’d share this poem that reminds me how expensive the universes and how wonderful it is to experience just one more day with what is truly and personally meaningful in life, whatever that may be for you or for me. I don’t know a lot of poetry, but this one has stayed with me for decades, and stayed in my family for perhaps even a century or more. Somethings just kind of follow you throughout life, stick with you, ya know?Maybe it’s important to slow down to think of what important may be lurking concealed all these years. Well, every once in a while, at least. Enjoy and share your own sources of hope and belief. Voices can be our victory!! 😉

Can We Spare a Moment Sharing About Traumatic Brain Injury? I Can Only Promise My Best.  I Can Only Ask the Same. 

This is the post excerpt.

This July marks one full year of brain injury rehabilitation for a moderate TBI suffered late 2015. Treatment professionals and doctors had a lot to say. They told me I wouldn’t walk, write, see, or talk the same – properly and safely; that I would never be the same person. I was told that I should give up on my dreams, because I would never be able to work again in any capacity close to prior functioning. From the start I had the encouragement and guidance of my best friend and life partner. She helped remind me who I am, and was one of the only people who stuck around to help, to love, and to remain loyal in my life. 

I am a fighter. I refuse limitation. I work to develop my mind and my heart during these couple years . Through this season of challenge, I lived in skilled nursing facilities, assisted rehab day programs, and brain injury outpatient services. Neurologists, neuro-endocrinologist, psychiatrist, speech, occupational therapy, cognitive rehabilitation therapy, physical therapy, education therapy, and the list goes on. I am nowhere near healed or back in action. But every day is a small shuffle towards progress, pride, and self empowerment. 

Never give up on yourself. Never give up on your dreams – dreams keep you alive, and nobody can take them from you. Nobody. 

Changing and challenges are inevitable for all of us. Do not only heal the wound, work always to develop both your heart and your body. It can be very difficult to get through life – all of us to know this, from time to time. So take the challenge as an opportunity to heal your wounds, relationships, and also to cultivate self compassion, acceptance, and belief in the myth and magic that life ceaselessly offers with every new dawn we wake to find. 
I love and respect you all. Good luck and stay strong, no matter what your story. 

-Sean Dudas