Consensus guidelines on screening for hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury.

Review article
Ghigo E, et al. Brain Inj. 2005.
Show full citation
Abstract
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: The goal of this consensus statement is to increase awareness among endocrinologists and physicians treating patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) of the incidence and risks of hypopituitarism among patients with TBI.

RATIONALE: TBI poses significant risk to the pituitary gland, leading to elevated risks of diabetes, hypopituitarism and other endocrinopathies. Signs and symptoms associated with hypopituitarism often mimic the sequellae of TBI, although the severity of symptoms is not necessarily related to the severity of the injury. Patients with TBI-induced hypopituitarism may benefit both physically and psychologically from appropriate hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Participants at this unique consensus meeting attempted to define and spearhead an approach to increase awareness of the risks of TBI-induced endocrinopathies, in particular growth hormone deficiency (GHD), and to outline necessary and practical objectives for managing this condition.

RECOMMENDATIONS: Systematic screening of pituitary function is recommended for all patients with moderate-to-severe TBI at risk of developing pituitary deficits. Patients with hypopituitarism benefit from appropriate hormonal replacement and prospects for rehabilitation of patients with TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be enhanced by appropriate HRT. Further exploration of this possibility requires: (1) active collaboration between divisions of endocrinology and rehabilitation at the local level to perform a screening of pituitary function in patients after TBI, (2) creation of a consultancy service by endocrine societies for use by rehabilitation centres, (3) development of continuing medical education (CME) programmes that can be offered as crossover training to the physicians who manage the care of patients with TBIs, (4) targeting of patient organizations with educational information for dissemination to patients and their families, (5) continued efforts to more clearly define the population at greatest risk of TBI-induced hypopituitarism and (6) monitor results of efficacy studies as they become available to evaluate whether and how much replacement therapy can improve the symptoms of individuals with TBI-induced hypopituitarism.

PMID 16195185 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Full text
Full text at journal site

Advertisements

Author: tbihealing

Sean Dudas is a California native and remains active and interested in many corners of life. In November of 2015, Sean suffered a moderate traumatic brain injury from a fall; his life since has been solely devoted to the topic of this blog - TBI and other forms of acquired brain injury. With his passions and life as he imagined it to be on an indeterminate hold during his rehabilitation and recovery, he began this blog and a TBI health advocacy group. Through uniform rules of professional responsibility and ethics, he hopes the health advocate profession may be an affordable adjunct to the team needed by every brain injured person and those caring for them. He hopes that this blog will continue educating and supporting survivors of brain injury, their caregivers, and anyone interested in this devastating medical sojourn, alongside the discovery of a new self and a meaningful life outside the treatment environment. Sean is active in supporting mental health and suicide crisis support, various manifestations of trauma in children and adults, and is a Doctor of Law with a focus on health and science law. He is also an athlete, poet, writer, and nature enthusiast.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s