Symptoms associated with mild traumatic brain injury and concussion: the role of bother.

Symptoms associated with mild traumatic brain injury/concussion: the role of bother.
Bergman K, et al. J Neurosci Nurs. 2013. PMID 23558978 [PubMed – indexed…

Abstract
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 1.4 million Americans annually, and mild TBI (MTBI) accounts for approximately 75% of those injured. For those with mild injury who seek treatment in an emergency department, there is inconsistency in the management and follow-up recommendations. Approximately, 38% of patients treated in the emergency department for MTBI are discharged with no recommendations for follow-up. In addition, there are an unknown number of persons with MTBI who do not seek healthcare after their injury. Persons with MTBI are, for the most part, managing their concussion symptoms on their own. The purpose of this study was to describe the symptom experience for persons with mild TBI and identify whether there was an association between being bothered by symptoms and self-management of symptoms. The sample for this study included 30 persons with MTBI and a 30-person comparison group. Results indicate that persons within 3 months of their MTBI report an average of 19 symptoms, whereas the comparison group reported six symptoms, and that the most frequently reported symptoms are not always the symptoms rated as most severe or most bothersome. Persons with MTBI reported their most common symptoms to be headache (n = 25, 83%), feeling tired (n = 24, 80%), difficulty thinking and being irritable (each n = 22, 73%), dizziness, trouble remembering, and being forgetful (each n = 21, 70%). There is a significant relationship between overall reports of being bothered by symptoms and the use of symptom management strategies (F = 8.322, p = .008). Persons are more likely to use symptom management strategies when they are bothered by the symptoms. Nurses can assist with symptom self-management by providing simple symptom management strategies to assist with the symptom management process. Early symptom management for the MTBI population may improve the outcomes such as return to work and role functions, for this population.

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Author: tbihealing

Sean Dudas is a California native and remains active and interested in many corners of life. In November of 2015, Sean suffered a moderate traumatic brain injury from a fall; his life since has been solely devoted to the topic of this blog - TBI and other forms of acquired brain injury. With his passions and life as he imagined it to be on an indeterminate hold during his rehabilitation and recovery, he began this blog and a TBI health advocacy group. Through uniform rules of professional responsibility and ethics, he hopes the health advocate profession may be an affordable adjunct to the team needed by every brain injured person and those caring for them. He hopes that this blog will continue educating and supporting survivors of brain injury, their caregivers, and anyone interested in this devastating medical sojourn, alongside the discovery of a new self and a meaningful life outside the treatment environment. Sean is active in supporting mental health and suicide crisis support, various manifestations of trauma in children and adults, and is a Doctor of Law with a focus on health and science law. He is also an athlete, poet, writer, and nature enthusiast.

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