Microenvironment changes in mild traumatic brain injury.

Review article
Kan EM, et al. Brain Res Bull. 2012.
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Abstract
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public-health problem for which mild TBI (MTBI) makes up majority of the cases. MTBI is a poorly-understood health problem and can persist for years manifesting into neurological and non-neurological problems that can affect functional outcome. Presently, diagnosis of MTBI is based on symptoms reporting with poor understanding of ongoing pathophysiology, hence precluding prognosis and intervention. Other than rehabilitation, there is still no pharmacological treatment for the treatment of secondary injury and prevention of the development of cognitive and behavioural problems. The lack of external injuries and absence of detectable brain abnormalities lend support to MTBI developing at the cellular and biochemical level. However, the paucity of suitable and validated non-invasive methods for accurate diagnosis of MTBI poses as a substantial challenge. Hence, it is crucial that a clinically useful evaluation and management procedure be instituted for MTBI that encompasses both molecular pathophysiology and functional outcome. The acute microenvironment changes post-MTBI presents an attractive target for modulation of MTBI symptoms and the development of cognitive changes later in life.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
PMID 22289840 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE

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Author: tbihealing

Sean Dudas is a California native and remains active and interested in many corners of life. In November of 2015, Sean suffered a moderate traumatic brain injury from a fall; his life since has been solely devoted to the topic of this blog - TBI and other forms of acquired brain injury. With his passions and life as he imagined it to be on an indeterminate hold during his rehabilitation and recovery, he began this blog and a TBI health advocacy group. Through uniform rules of professional responsibility and ethics, he hopes the health advocate profession may be an affordable adjunct to the team needed by every brain injured person and those caring for them. He hopes that this blog will continue educating and supporting survivors of brain injury, their caregivers, and anyone interested in this devastating medical sojourn, alongside the discovery of a new self and a meaningful life outside the treatment environment. Sean is active in supporting mental health and suicide crisis support, various manifestations of trauma in children and adults, and is a Doctor of Law with a focus on health and science law. He is also an athlete, poet, writer, and nature enthusiast.

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